Another day, another out of proportion Facebook story

Emma Barnett takes issue with Facebook’s couple’s pages.

And that is what I love about Facebook and always have: that ability to easily share images and information with those you care about and celebrate big events in a large digital group.

However, please take note Facebook executives: enjoy being able to share the information wish and curate in the way I want. I have no desire for your technology teams to help me organise my photos – nor do I wish to have a shared ‘couples’ Facebook profile with my other half on which you automatically curate our relationship.

Over the weekend I discovered I had just that – but only through a friend telling me. I didn’t receive a notification from Facebook informing me that their squat team in Palo Alto, California, had taken the liberty of creating me a joint digital profile with my husband.

Here’s what Emma doesn’t understand. These are search pages, just special ones that you are automatically created—not curated—when you type a special URL into your web browser’s address bar. Just add and=username after your own profile URL and you’ll get a timeline of activity shared with any of your friends. /us is a special alias that will divert to the search page between you and your significant other on Facebook. There’s nothing creepy here, that I can see, just more out of proportion reactions to something new, different and innovative. It’s no different, really, than typing your name into Google and seeing your face and other personal details from social networks mashed up in a sidebar.

What I wish is that people would take a little more time to understand things, rather than dashing off their first, and often ill-informed opinion. I mean, if your best headline is that something makes you want to wretch, maybe it’s a sign you need to take some time to digest.

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Justin is a writer and actor in Washington, D.C. His non-fiction stories have appeared in Wired, Popular Science and San Diego Citybeat among authors. He's the author of the Station One Series and Treknology: Star Trek' Tech 200 Years Ahead of the Future.
November 12, 2012